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Article
June 28, 1952

TEMPORAL ARTERITIS: REPORT OF A CASE IN WHICH INVOLVED CRANIAL VESSELS WERE TREATED BY SURGICAL DIVISION

Author Affiliations

Oakland, Calif.

JAMA. 1952;149(9):826-828. doi:10.1001/jama.1952.72930260001009
Abstract

Hutchinson1 first described temporal arteritis in 1890. Interest in this entity was renewed in 1932, when Horton, Magath, and Brown2 described the clinical and pathologic features of arteritis involving the temporal vessels. Since that time an increasing number of cases have been reported in the literature, although to date the number of cases of histologically proved temporal or cranial arteritis remains relatively small. It seems likely that the disease is considerably commoner than the number of cases reported to date would indicate. In 1948 Crosby and Wadsworth3 comprehensively reviewed the subject, and more recently Protas and Saidman4 reviewed the cases in which the disease was proved by biopsy or autopsy.

Temporal arteritis represents a distinct clinical entity that usually affects persons in the older age groups and is characterized by local inflammatory changes along the course of one or more cranial arteries. Systemic reactions such as

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