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Article
July 12, 1952

ACUTE ULCERS OF UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL TRACT: THEIR RELATION TO SYSTEMIC STRESS AND ADRENAL DAMAGE

Author Affiliations

Cleveland
From the Department of Pathology and Gastroenterology, St. Luke's Hospital.

JAMA. 1952;149(11):984-987. doi:10.1001/jama.1952.02930280006002
Abstract

An acute ulcer of a nonspecific type is the initial lesion in the development of a chronic peptic ulcer. This fact has been presumptively established by experimental evidence from the laboratory and descriptive evidence obtained during surgical procedures and necropsy.1 However, few investigators have directed their attention toward acute ulcers of the upper gastrointestinal tract, while the literature on chronic ulcers is abundant.

It is very difficult to gather evidence of acute ulcers, because they heal very rapidly, and the majority heal without leaving a trace. Acute ulcers are difficult to demonstrate by radiography, and are seen only when the stomach is inspected by the gastroscope, at operation, or at necropsy. Selye2 reports that acute gastrointestinal ulcers have formed during the alarm reaction following systemic stress. He has shown that various stresses that affect large portions of the body, such as trauma, surgery, burns, infections, fatigue, or emotional

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