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Article
July 26, 1952

LIVER NECROSIS AND DEATH FOLLOWING HEPATIC ARTERY LIGATION

Author Affiliations

Indianapolis

From the Veterans Administration Hospital, Indianapolis.

JAMA. 1952;149(13):1210-1212. doi:10.1001/jama.1952.72930300001009
Abstract

Recent reports, first by Rienhoff1 and later by Berman,2 have indicated that patients with cirrhosis complicated by esophageal varices and ascites may benefit from ligation of the hepatic artery. It has been commonly assumed previously that viability of the liver was dependent on adequate blood supply through the hepatic artery and that ligation of this vessel would result in liver necrosis and death. Markowitz, Rappaport, and Scott3 reported that in dogs liver necrosis and death following such an operation could be avoided, in most cases, by administration of penicillin, indicating that the necrosis was probably the result of infection from the anaerobic bacteria normally present in the liver of dogs. Grindlay, Mann, and Bollman4 recently suggested the possibility that in those animals that survived there had not been complete stoppage of the blood supply to the liver through the ligated artery or that collateral channels had

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