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Article
August 9, 1952

TREATMENT OF MALARIA WITH A SINGLE DOSE OF AMODIAQUINE OR CHLOROQUINE

Author Affiliations

La Lima, Honduras
From the Medical Service of the Tela Railroad Company (United Fruit Company) Hospital.

JAMA. 1952;149(15):1369-1371. doi:10.1001/jama.1952.02930320009003
Abstract

Since the development of 4-aminoquinoline compounds, particularly chloroquine (aralen® [Winthrop-Stearns]) andamodiaquine (camoquin® [Parke-Davis]), the treatment of malaria has become much simpler than it was a few years ago. Published reports stress the rapidity with which symptoms are alleviated and the speed with which parasites disappear from the peripheral blood when either of these drugs is administered.

Chloroquine and amodiaquine have the following pharmacologic and clinical properties in common: 1. They are rapidly and essentially completely absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract of experimental animals and presumably of man. 2. They are distributed unequally in the body tissues and are present in much higher concentrations in some tissues than in blood plasma. 3. They are slowly excreted from the body on cessation of drug therapy. 4. They are highly effective in terminating acute attacks of malaria due to either Plasmodium falciparum or P. vivax. 5. They usually result in complete eradication of

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