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Article
August 9, 1952

A STUDY OF RUBBER ADHESIVES IN SHOES AS THE CAUSE OF DERMATITIS OF THE FEET

Author Affiliations

Boston
Dr. Miller is now residing in Salem, Ore.; From the Department of Dermatology, Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital.

JAMA. 1952;149(15):1371-1374. doi:10.1001/jama.1952.02930320011004
Abstract

Dermatoses of the feet are troublesome and rather common. They range from mild fissuring between the toes to severe vesiculation, oozing, and edema of almost the entire foot. They may be of short or long duration. They may be sufficiently severe so that a physician is consulted early in the course of the disease, or they may be mild enough to have been self-medicated for many months before the aid of a physician is sought. The signs and symptoms of different dermatoses of the feet may be sufficiently similar so that it becomes difficult to diagnose and treat the dermatoses. It is the purpose of this paper to discuss the specific agent that causes allergic eczematous contact-type dermatitis of the feet, a condition that we believe is now being confused with epidermophytosis, bacterial infections, and inflammatory skin conditions from other causes. This condition clears readily when the allergen is eliminated.

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