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Article
August 9, 1952

CHROMIUM INTOXICATION: WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO HEPATIC INJURY

Author Affiliations

Chicago
From the Hektoen Institute for Medical Research of the Cook County Hospital and the Department of Medicine, Stritch School of Medicine, Loyola University.

JAMA. 1952;149(15):1385-1389. doi:10.1001/jama.1952.02930320025008
Abstract

Although chromium compounds have been known for many years to be toxic to various organs of the body, primary hepatic injury has not been a conspicuous clinical finding. The organs most frequently injured by these agents appear to be those that come in direct contact with them, either by external exposure or by excretion, namely, the skin, the mucous membranes, and the kidneys.

A variety of surface lesions have been ascribed to contact with soluble chromium compounds. As early as 1827, Cumin1 described the characteristic "chrome hole" lesions. These occur on exposed parts of the skin, especially the hands, and are punched out, deeply penetrating, painless ulcers.2 Macular erythema, scarlatinoid and pustular eruptions, and eczematoid lesions of the skin due to contact with these substances have also been reported.3 Ulceration and perforation of the nasal septum due to inhalation of plating solution fumes have been described frequently.

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