[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 18.204.227.250. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
August 9, 1952

HUMAN POISONING BY CHLORDANE: REPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

Houston, Texas

JAMA. 1952;149(15):1394-1395. doi:10.1001/jama.1952.72930320005009d
Abstract

The newer insecticides have proved their value in control of insects.1 Since the products have been made available to the public, however, accidental poisonings have occurred. We are reporting our experience in such a circumstance.

Chlordane, a chlorinated hydrocarbon having the empirical formula C10 H6 Cl8, is in the pure state a viscous, amber-colored, odorless liquid. It can be formulated for use in varying strengths as an oil solution, an emulsion concentrate, a dust, or a wettable powder.2 Human toxicity of these preparations depends on the type of vehicle as well as the concentration of chlordane. Some of the toxic manifestations ascribed to chlordane preparations may be due to the vehicle alone.3 Contamination of the skin with certain petroleum distillates has produced anesthesias and paresthesias that may be due to the fat solvent properties of the distillates.4

The insecticide enters the body by

×