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Article
May 15, 1954

THERMOMETER FOR MEASURING BODY TEMPERATURE IN HYPOTHERMIA

JAMA. 1954;155(3):251-252. doi:10.1001/jama.1954.73690210005006c
Abstract

To meet the need for a rugged, easily read thermometer having a flexible probe, a relatively simple instrument has been devised and tested. It consists of a thermistor that rapidly changes in electrical resistance with small changes in temperature, a source of current, and a device to measure the flow of current that is calibrated in such a way as to read temperature directly. It is designed to operate linearly in the range in which experimental and clinical work in hypothermia is involved, 20 C (68 F) to 41 C (105 F). For a discussion of other types of instruments for measuring temperature, the review by Burton1 may be consulted. The apparatus described by Weiss and Ripstein,2 which is useful for continuous recording, has the disadvantage of depending on a flexible capillary tube that may break or change its characteristics on continued bending.

The temperature-sensitive thermistor element is

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