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Article
August 23, 1952

DETECTION OF OCCULT BLOOD AS A ROUTINE OFFICE PROCEDURE

JAMA. 1952;149(17):1526-1528. doi:10.1001/jama.1952.02930340010004
Abstract

Death from malignant diseases now holds the second position as a destroyer of human life in America. Most physicians have had the disquieting experience of making the diagnosis of malignant disease too late to be able to offer any effective treatment. Our great hope for the future lies in the discovery of some agent that will destroy malignant tissue wherever it exists or perhaps will even prevent the very inception of malignant disease. Until the day when such an agent becomes a practical actuality, we must content ourselves with the use of the tools at hand.

A nation-wide campaign is under way to educate the public in the early detection of cancer. It therefore behooves us as physicians to reexamine and to use every practical means available to detect the presence of cancer in its early phases. The American Cancer Society and the National Cancer Institute have found that cancer

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