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Article
August 30, 1952

MEDICAL PROBLEMS CREATED BY A NATIONAL BLOOD PROGRAM: CHAIRMAN'S ADDRESS

Author Affiliations

St. Louis

From the Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1952;149(18):1613-1616. doi:10.1001/jama.1952.02930350001001
Abstract

The development of effective transfusion services is one of the major medical accomplishments of the past three decades. During this time, methods have been developed for storing blood; techniques have been greatly improved; additional blood groups of clinical importance have been recognized so that determination of compatibility can be more specific; and plasma has been dried and fractionated. These technical and scientific advances made possible the formation and development of blood banks. Physicians were quick to use the blood as it became more readily available, because mortality was thereby lowered both in civilian and in military practice. This experience stimulated an even more rapid growth of organized transfusion services, both in hospitals and on a community basis. There are now several state-wide transfusion programs, and that of the American Red Cross extends throughout many communities of the nation as a whole. A similar expansion has occurred in many other countries.

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