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Article
August 30, 1952

MESENTERIC VENOUS THROMBOSIS ASSOCIATED WITH ACUTE APPENDICITIS IN A YOUNG CHILD: RECOVERY FOLLOWING RESECTION OF INFARCTED INTESTINE

Author Affiliations

New York

From the Department of Surgery, New York Medical College.

JAMA. 1952;149(18):1634-1636. doi:10.1001/jama.1952.02930350022006
Abstract

Mesenteric vascular occlusion is one of the rarest and most uniformly fatal of the intra-abdominal catastrophes. Without surgical therapy, the condition carries an extremely grave prognosis. The recently reported mortality rates following definitive operative treatment vary between 60% and 70%.1 McClenahan and Fisher,1e reviewing the literature up to 1948 and including their own series, were able to report a total of 616 cases of mesenteric vascular occlusion, in 43 (7%) of which the condition was treated successfully by intestinal resection.

Mesenteric vascular occlusion may be arterial or venous in origin. Arterial occlusion is most often associated with arteriosclerosis and cardiac disease. Mesenteric venous thrombosis is usually a complication of acute intra-abdominal infections, such as acute appendicitis, pelvic thrombophlebitis and abscess, and diverticulitis and peritonitis.2

The age range of greatest incidence of mesenteric vascular occlusion is between 20 and 70 years, with an average age of 43 years.

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