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Article
September 8, 1956

INDUCTION OF CARDIAC PAIN BY ORALLY GIVEN TOLAZOLINE (PRISCOLINE) HYDROCHLORIDE

JAMA. 1956;162(2):108-110. doi:10.1001/jama.1956.72970190001007
Abstract

It is not generally appreciated that cardiac pain can be induced by adrenergic blocking agents in patients who have a history of arteriosclerotic heart disease. The precipitation of such pain by orally administered tolazoline (Priscoline) hydrochloride has apparently not heretofore been reported. It is the purpose of this study to present a case in which such a reaction was induced on three separate occasions by orally given tolazoline and once by Dibenzyline (N-phenoxyisopropyl-N-benzyl-β-chloroethylamine hydrochloride) given under relatively controlled conditions. A mechanism whereby this reaction may take place in the absence of changes in pulse or blood pressure is suggested.

Report of a Case  A 65-year-old widow was admitted to the National Heart Institute for evaluation of hypertension of 25 years' duration. She felt well until five years prior to admission, when she experienced an acute depressive episode that necessitated electroconvulsive therapy, after which she made a rapid and uneventful recovery.

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