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Article
October 11, 1952

CHRONIC ARSENIC POISONING FOLLOWING USE OF AN ASTHMA REMEDY

Author Affiliations

Los Angeles

From the Cedars of Lebanon Hospital.

JAMA. 1952;150(6):584-585. doi:10.1001/jama.1952.63680060003015a
Abstract

Arsenic poisoning has been known since ancient times. Popular during the Middle Ages as a homicidal agent, arsenic is now a rather frequent cause of poisoning following the accidental ingestion of matches, insecticides, or rat poisons.1 Inorganic arsenic is still used in treatment of a variety of diseases. It is recommended for the therapy of lichen planus2 and psoriasis.3 It is often effective as a palliative in treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia, because of its activity in depressing the formation of leukocytes.4 Recently, two patients with severe cutaneous manifestations of chronic arsenic intoxication were reported.5 Both had been treated for bronchial asthma with remedies containing Fowler's solution. The following case history illustrates arsenic intoxication of a severer degree, apparently resulting from chronic ingestion of a similar mixture containing Fowler's solution.

REPORT OF A CASE  Mrs. G. M., a 41-year-old white woman, was referred to the

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