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Article
November 10, 1956

FIVE-YEAR STUDY OF BENZTROPINE (COGENTIN) METHANESULFONATEOUTCOME IN THREE HUNDRED TWO CASES OF PARALYSIS AGITANS

JAMA. 1956;162(11):1031-1034. doi:10.1001/jama.1956.02970280011004
Abstract

• Benztropine, a synthetic drug with anticholinergic, antihistaminic, and sedative actions, was administered by mouth to 302 patients with various forms of Parkinsonism. The drug was found to have peripheral curariform effects that are long-lasting, cumulative, and very useful. Doses of 5 to 10 mg. thrice daily caused excessive flaccidity, to the extent that a patient was unable to lift his arm or raise his head off the pillow. Best results, in the control of rigidity, contracture, tremor, and insomnia, were obtained in the dosage range of 1 to 4 mg. a day for older patients and 2 to 8 mg. a day for younger ones. Abnormalities of gait, which troubled 56 patients, were alleviated in 35 of these. Three case histories are given to illustrate the relief from insomnia, night cramps, rigidity, and tremor, the recurrence of symptoms when the drug was temporarily withdrawn, the safety of continued use for more than five years, and the possibility of obviating side-effects, when they do occur, by simultaneous administration of phenindamine and trihexyphenidyl.

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