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Article
October 25, 1952

MEDICALLY TREATED SMALL GASTRIC ULCER: FIVE YEAR FOLLOW-UP STUDY OF FOUR HUNDRED FOURTEEN PATIENTS

Author Affiliations

Rochester, Minn.
From the Mayo Foundation, University of Minnesota (Dr. Jordan), and the Division of Medicine (Drs. Cain and Comfort) and the Division of Surgery (Dr. Gray), Mayo Clinic.

JAMA. 1952;150(8):781-784. doi:10.1001/jama.1952.03680080043010
Abstract

For many years at the Mayo Clinic partial gastrectomy has been the treatment of choice in 60 to 70% of cases of apparently benign gastric ulcer.1 This has been so because the 10% of patients whose ulcers prove cancerous are given the best chances of cure, the morbidity due to benign ulcer is terminated promptly, the results of surgical treatment of the benign ulcer are excellent, and the risk of surgical treatment is small (1 to 2% mortality). In the remaining 30 to 40% of cases medical treatment has been instituted, in some at the insistence of the patient and in others for various reasons with the approval of the physician. In some cases this medical treatment has been instituted at the clinic, but in most cases it has been instituted elsewhere. Such treatment has varied widely in strictness because many physicians with varying viewpoints regarding medical treatment have

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