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Article
December 1, 1956

GENERALIZED CYTOMEGALIC INCLUSION DISEASE IN NEWBORN INFANTS

JAMA. 1956;162(14):1305-1308. doi:10.1001/jama.1956.02970310033008
Abstract

• Generalized cytomegalic inclusion disease is an intrauterine infection that, in its most serious form, causes symptoms at or soon after birth. The two infants here described had icterus, extensive petechial or ecchymotic hemorrhages, hepatomegaly, splenomegaly, and various laboratory findings indicating a severe blood dyscrasia. One infant died an hour after birth; the other at birth exhibited signs of hemolytic icterus and an anemia that progressed at first but was ultimately controlled. Numerous fresh urine specimens obtained from the second infant during the first two weeks yielded a sediment that, on fixing and staining, exhibited enlarged cells with typical cytoplasmic as well as intranuclear inclusions. The second infant is one of three now known to have survived this disease. The causative organism is a salivary gland virus that probably infects a large proportion of the population subclinically at an early age. The infant who survived was treated with vitamin K intramuscularly, benzathine penicillin G orally, prednisolone, and corticotropin.

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