[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 18.204.227.250. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
November 15, 1952

PRESENT STATUS OF CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS OF TOXOPLASMOSIS IN MAN: INDICATIONS AND PROVISIONS FOR ROUTINE SEROLOGIC DIAGNOSIS

Author Affiliations

Cincinnati; New York; Syracuse, N. Y.; Bethesda, Md.
From the Children's Hospital Research Foundation, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine (Dr. Sabin). Department of Pediatrics, The New York Hospital—Cornell Medical Center (Dr. Eichenwald), Department of Medicine, State University of New York at Syracuse, and University Hospital of The Good Shepherd (Dr. Feldman), and Laboratory of Tropical Diseases, National Institutes of Health (Dr. Jacobs).

JAMA. 1952;150(11):1063-1069. doi:10.1001/jama.1952.03680110003002
Abstract

The increasing number of publications on the actual and suspected role of Toxoplasma in human disease throughout the world has created an interest, in diverse branches of the medical profession, regarding the clinical manifestations and diagnosis of this source of infection. Pediatricians, ophthalmologists, and obstetricians have a special interest in this problem. Having supported studies on the role of Toxoplasma in human disease, the Research Grants Division of the National Institutes of Health, through its tropical medicine study section, called a conference to determine whether or not the time had come to transfer some of the responsibilities for the diagnosis of human toxoplasmosis from the sphere of research to that of routine practice. The first conference held in August, 1951, and a subsequent one held in July, 1952, reviewed the most recent experiences of a number of research laboratories with the serologic tests currently used for the diagnosis of toxoplasmosis,

×