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Article
November 15, 1952

ANTIHISTAMINES AS LOCAL ANESTHETIC AGENTS FOR URETHRAL MANIPULATION

Author Affiliations

Orlando, Fla.

JAMA. 1952;150(11):1092-1094. doi:10.1001/jama.1952.03680110032009
Abstract

Not infrequently patients are encountered who manifest sensitivity to local anesthetic agents. The urethral mucous membrane is a very effective absorbing surface, and poisoning has frequently occurred from the application of local anesthetics. The rapidity of absorption is well illustrated by the fact that the injection of 1% apomorphine into the urethra of the male dog results in vomiting in three to five minutes. In the past many patients have been seen who demonstrated atopic responses to the extent that it became necessary to carry out urethral manipulations without the aid of any anesthetic agents. Having learned of the anesthetic action produced by the antihistamines when applied topically in other specialized fields of work such as gastroenterology and dentistry, we made an effort to determine their usefulness from the standpoint of surface anesthesia in the urological patient.

PRIOR STUDIES  Rosenthal and Minard1 are credited with being the first to

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