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Article
November 15, 1952

AORTIC STENOSIS MANIFESTED AS CHRONIC COR PULMONALE

Author Affiliations

Philadelphia
From the Department of Medicine, Temple University Medical School and Hospital. Associate Professor of Medicine, Temple University Medical School and Hospital, and Chief, Medical Service "B," Episcopal Hospital (Dr. Soloff); Instructor of Medicine, Temple University Medical School and Hospital (Dr. Zatuchni); Resident in Medicine, Temple University Medical School and Hospital (Dr. Turner).

JAMA. 1952;150(11):1111-1113. doi:10.1001/jama.1952.63680110009013d
Abstract

Aortic stenosis is notoriously difficult to diagnose during life in the absence of classical findings. Characteristically, a harsh systolic murmur is audible in the second interspace to the right of the sternum, in which a systolic thrill is palpable.1 The murmur is transmitted upward into the vessels of the neck. The second aortic sound is faint or absent. The blood pressure is low, and the heart rate is slow. The radial pulse rate is low and slow in rising.

Classical findings are frequently absent. There may be associated hypertension that changes the character of the pulse and of the second aortic sound; this can also occur with the accentuated second pulmonic sound present in failure of the left side of the heart or in mitral stenosis. The murmur may not be intense enough either to give rise to a thrill or to be transmitted upward. On the other hand,

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