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Article
November 15, 1952

ABDOMINAL APOPLEXY IN A CHILD: REPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

Milwaukee
From the Department of Surgery, Marquette University School of Medicine and St. Joseph's Hospital.

JAMA. 1952;150(11):1115-1117. doi:10.1001/jama.1952.63680110013013g
Abstract

Bleeding into the retroperitoneal space after trauma is not uncommon, but spontaneous retroperitoneal hemorrhage is rare.1 The condition has been termed abdominal apoplexy. Marks and Freedlander stated in 1945 that only 25 such cases had been reported since the first such report, in 1911.2 To these they added 3 of their own cases, for a total of 28. In the same year Kenny and Doniach3 described a 30-year-old woman in the 36th week of pregnancy who died from a spontaneous retroperitoneal hemorrhage, and in 1949 Baker and Graf4 reported a case of massive spontaneous hemorrhage into the left perirenal area in a 49-year-old man with adrenal anaplastic carcinoma.5 The average age in the 30 patients mentioned above was 48 years. The only report of spontaneous retroperitoneal hemorrhage in a child appears to be the one by Garland, who in 1949 operated on a 2-year-old girl

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