[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
November 22, 1952

INDUSTRIAL MEDICAL ASPECTS OF CHEST DISEASES OF OCCUPATIONAL ORIGIN

Author Affiliations

Cincinnati

JAMA. 1952;150(12):1173-1177. doi:10.1001/jama.1952.03680120009003
Abstract

This discussion is concerned with the management of that patient or groups of patients on whom the label of a pulmonary dust disease has been placed either by the family physician or by a consulting chest specialist. From the narrower viewpoint, it is the classification that has been applied to those persons who are referred to our office for evaluation and treatment. Such patients may or may not have true pulmonary fibrosis, but they always present symptoms that, in one fashion or another, are referable to pulmonary disability. These considerations make it important that all the factors that have contributed to the disease process and the subsequent disability be studied as objectively as possible with whatever tools and disciplines are available.

DIAGNOSTIC CONSIDERATIONS  The diagnosis of pulmonary dust disease, as of any other occupational disease, implies that injury has been sustained in and because of the working environment and that

×