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Article
June 2, 1956

NEUROMUSCULAR PERFORMANCE AND SENSORY RECEPTIVITY IN A TRIPLE CONGENITAL AMPUTEEREPORT OF A CASE

JAMA. 1956;161(5):439-440. doi:10.1001/jama.1956.62970050006008b
Abstract

This report of a 22-year-old man, born without lower arms and hands and without the distal end of the right leg, supports Adrian's observation that "The nervous system reacts to relations between stimuli and performs the appropriate task with any part of the motor system that is available. We cannot represent it as a series of machines for operating on the map of events unless we add a number of devices to make good this fundamental difference. On the sensory side there must be something to abstract the significant elements of a pattern and on the motor side something to do just the reverse, to convert the abstraction into a concrete movement."1

The patient, when standing, carries his weight on the left lower extremity and on the right lower extremity prosthesis. X-rays reveal an abnormal skeletal structure of the left foot (figure, A). Despite his multiple deformity, this patient,

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