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Article
December 20, 1952

SOME ASPECTS OF THE LEUKEMIA PROBLEM: THE MINOT LECTURE

Author Affiliations

Ann Arbor, Mich.
From the Thomas Henry Simpson Memorial Institute for Medical Research, University of Michigan.

JAMA. 1952;150(16):1551-1556. doi:10.1001/jama.1952.03680160001001
Abstract

George Richards Minot will be remembered for his ability as a teacher and clinician, but of all his contributions to medicine, the introduction of liver in the treatment of pernicious anemia was the greatest. By so doing he provided the means whereby patients with this otherwise inevitably fatal disorder could survive in a good state of health for a normal span of life. For this he was the co-recipient of the Nobel Prize in 1934.

This monumental discovery is an excellent example of how much can be accomplished by a man if he has a comprehensive knowledge of medicine, persistence, abundant enthusiasm, dogged determination, and an inquiring and restless mind. In his thoughts he was constantly casting here and there for the solution of some clinical problem, often, but not always, of a hematological nature. But he did not usually conclude such speculalations without putting his thoughts into action. In

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