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Article
December 27, 1952

CORTICOTROPIN, CORTISONE, AND HYDROCORTISONE IN TREATMENT OF OCULAR DISEASE

JAMA. 1952;150(17):1660-1664. doi:10.1001/jama.1952.03680170014004
Abstract

The field of ophthalmology has witnessed widespread clinical trial of corticotropin (ACTH) and cortisone during the past two and one-half years, and the accumulated results of many investigators justify the use of these agents in the treatment of a variety of ocular diseases. When corticotropin was first available for clinical trial late in 1949, evidence had accumulated that suggested it might be of value in the treatment of certain eye diseases. For years ophthalmologists had been using fever therapy, usually in the form of intravenously injected, killed typhoid organisms, in the treatment of a number of ocular lesions. It has been pointed out that the benefits of fever therapy apparently are derived from an acceleration of mechanisms evoked in acute stress states.1 Reaction to such stress depends upon the endogenous release of corticotropin, which in turn stimulates the adrenal cortex to liberate 11-oxycorticosteroids. Selye2 and Albright3 have

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