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Article
June 9, 1956

HARDSHIPS OF INDIAN MEDICAL MEN AND WOMEN TAKING RESIDENCY TRAINING IN UNITED STATES HOSPITALS

JAMA. 1956;161(6):553-554. doi:10.1001/jama.1956.02970060067020

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Abstract

To the Editor:—  Due to the cold war, the United States is still geared to a war economy. The medical men of the United States are subject to draft into the armed forces like civilians and are retained in them in large numbers. Hence, civilian hospitals are undermanned and quite a few of them had to shut down their wards because they could not procure adequate personnel. American hospitals could absorb all the doctors that foreign countries could send here in the residency division, where a physician stays in the hospital and works almost 24 hours a day taking care of bed patients and those who come to the clinics in exchange for board and lodging and a monthly honorarium so low that a dishwasher makes that much in a week. The excuse is that these doctors are learning their vocation. So many Indian doctors have complained that with their

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