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Article
February 9, 1957

CHLORISONDAMINE (ECOLID) CHLORIDE IN MEDICAL TREATMENT OF SEVERE HYPERTENSION

JAMA. 1957;163(6):429-436. doi:10.1001/jama.1957.02970410019007
Abstract

• The cardiovascular-renal status of 21 hypertensive patients was followed through a total of 122 patienttreatment months, during which comparisons were made between treatments including chlorisondamine and treatments with or without other ganglion-blocking drugs such as hexamethonium and pentolinium. All patients had either a malignant or a severe benign hypertension, and three died despite treatment during the course of the investigation. Hemodynamic measurements in four patients indicated that the chlorisondamine caused the fall in blood pressure by lowering the peripheral resistance rather than the cardiac output. Its use permitted a reduction of the average diastolic blood pressure to 100 mm. Hg or below in 18 patients. The side-effects, which included dizziness, blurred vision, photophobia, and fatigue, caused four patients to refuse to continue taking the drug. Its advantages and disadvantages are illustrated by six detailed case histories.

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