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Article
March 2, 1957

USE OF PREDNISONE, AND PREDNISOLONE IN TREATMENT OF ALLERGIC DISEASES

JAMA. 1957;163(9):713-718. doi:10.1001/jama.1957.02970440009003
Abstract

• Prednisone and prednisolone were administered interchangeably in varying dosages by mouth to patients with allergies, in order to determine the quantities needed for initial treatment and for maintenance. In 64 patients with bronchial asthma, the initial dosage was found to be 10 mg. four times per day for two days, and the maintenance dosage 5 mg. two or three times per day. In 38 patients with allergic dermatoses the initial dosage was found to be 30 to 40 mg. per day for three or four days, and the maintenance dosage 2.5 mg. per day. In 79 patients with seasonal allergic rhinitis the initial dosage was found to be 15 to 20 mg. per day for two or three weeks. In nine patients with perennial allergic rhinitis, the initial dosage was found to be 10 mg. four times per day (for two days) and the maintenance dosage 5 mg. twice per day. The histories of 13 patients are given to illustrate the fact that these hormones do not take the place of bronchodilator drugs, the need for adequate dosage, the usefulness of these hormones for either intermittent or continuous therapy, and their effects in rhinitis and dermatoses. The most frequent side-reactions noted were increased appetite and urinary frequency. These reactions were less frequent and less severe than those observed when cortisone and hydrocortisone are used for the above purposes. It was also less necessary to control the intake of sodium and potassium. Prednisone and prednisolone have substantial advantages over cortisone and hydrocortisone in the treatment of allergies, although they are not a substitute for careful individual management.

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