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Article
March 9, 1957

EFFECT OF A CITY ON THE FALL-OUT OF POLLENS AND MOLDSIMPLICATIONS FOR CIVIL DEFENSE

JAMA. 1957;163(10):803-804. doi:10.1001/jama.1957.02970450005002
Abstract

• Pollen counts were made in the air above and about a city on the west shore of Lake Michigan at a time when the wind was blowing from the southeast with a velocity of 7 knots (13 km. per hour). The counts involved Alternaria spores and ragweed pollen and were made at two different levels by airplane. The counts were found to be lowest north of the city, where they showed the combined effect of the air from the lake and rising air currents from the city. The conditions were duplicated experimentally by constructing a small model city, and it was shown that slightly warming the buildings caused air-borne Lycopodium spores to settle more densely over the rural areas about the city. This justifies the inference that the leeward parts of a city are safer than the country as regards radioactive fall-out after an atomic blast.

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