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Article
June 30, 1956

PRESERVATION AND TRANSFUSION OF BLOOD

JAMA. 1956;161(9):784-788. doi:10.1001/jama.1956.02970090010003
Abstract

• The transfusion of either whole blood or red blood cells is a frequent and valuable procedure but carries a definite risk of morbidity and mortality. The chief dangers include incompatibility reactions, fever or toxemia caused by bacterial contamination, infectious hepatitis, and overloading the circulation.

Standard practice has been to preserve blood in an acid-citrate-dextrose anticoagulant at 4 C for periods up to three weeks. Improvements in certain aspects of preservation and transfusion may be accomplished by the substitution of plastic containers for glassware and by supplementing the preservative solution with nucleosides or by use of subzero temperatures.

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