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Article
June 30, 1956

NEW METHOD OF PREPARING CONCENTRATED ERYTHROCYTES FOR TRANSFUSION

JAMA. 1956;161(9):862-863. doi:10.1001/jama.1956.62970090003017a
Abstract

Concentrated erythrocytes are generally prepared for transfusion by inserting a sterilized trocar through the stopper of a bottle containing sedimented or centrifuged citrated blood and by aspirating either the plasma or the erythrocyte layer. Despite all aseptic precautions, this entails an unavoidable risk of contamination. A new method has been devised that eliminates this danger, simplifies the technique, and makes it more economical.

The ever-widening therapeutic indications for concentrated erythrocytes have recently been reviewed,1 and a new indication—prevention of citrate intoxication— has been reported.2 It is becoming recognized that the risk of contamination is serious and constitutes the main obstacle to the widespread use of packed erythrocytes.1 One corollary is that concentrated erythrocytes must be used at once, so that any contaminating organisms will not have time to grow. The rate of contamination of bank blood has been found to be 2.24% at the time of collection

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