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Article
May 25, 1957

CYSTICERCOSIS CEREBRI-CESTODE INFESTATION OF HUMAN BRAINREPORT OF A CASE OCCURRING IN LOUISIANA

JAMA. 1957;164(4):401-405. doi:10.1001/jama.1957.62980040001011
Abstract

Invasion of the central nervous system of man by the larval form of the pork tapeworm is rarely encountered in the United States1 and Canada, and previous studies from these countries have reported individuals who were former residents of known endemic areas. However, in South America and certain countries of the Far East, the prevalence of cysticercosis cerebri is relatively high because of the greater frequency of intestinal infestation with Taenia solium in man. This difference in prevalence is due in part to the fact that raw pork is not usually eaten in the United States and Canada and also that these countries have public health laws regarding the disposal of garbage and the inspection of meat for human consumption. The purpose of this paper is to present a case of cerebral cysticercosis of the racemose type that was apparently contracted in Louisiana.

Cysticercosis is caused by larvae of

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