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Article
June 1, 1957

TREATMENT OF MILD DEPRESSIONS IN GENERAL OFFICE PRACTICE

JAMA. 1957;164(5):516-518. doi:10.1001/jama.1957.02980050006002
Abstract

• Depression manifests itself in both mental and physical symptoms, some of which escape recognition unless the physician is alert. The mental symptoms include not only a sad and morbid outlook but also guilt feelings, indecisiveness, loss of interest, and apprehension. The physical symptoms include loss of weight and a variety of functional disorders. If their nature is understood, the necessary treatment by psychotherapy, electroshock, or analeptics can be given. Sedatives and tranquilizers have no beneficial effect on the depression; some aggravate it. The danger of suicide must be kept in mind. Depression is a most distressing illness, but the prognosis is good. The patient must be encouraged by the interest and understanding of the physician. There is no greater satisfaction than to see a depressed patient restored from the depths of despair to a normal, happy life.

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