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Article
June 1, 1957

USEFUL PRECAUTIONS IN RADIOGRAPHY FROM THE GENETIC POINT OF VIEW

JAMA. 1957;164(5):553-554. doi:10.1001/jama.1957.62980050001013
Abstract

The recent report1 of the National Academy of Sciences—National Research Council concerning the biological effects of atomic radiation was quite reassuring as to the fall-out from nuclear weapon tests but raised an alarm in regard to the medical use of x-rays. "The medical use of x-rays should be reduced as much as is consistent with medical necessity," reads one of the recommendations of the genetics committee of the council, headed by Dr. Warren Weaver, vice-president for natural and medical sciences of the Rockefeller Foundation.

As a consequence of this report, given out at a press conference2 on June 12, 1956, there may be some public anxiety on the subject of x-rays. This situation concerns not only radiologists but physicians in general, who find x-ray studies increasingly valuable and who now are expected to reconsider them in terms of their value versus their danger.

For example, it was advised

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