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Article
June 8, 1957

SLIDING HIATAL HERNIA-SYMPTOMS, PATHOGENESIS, AND RESULTS OF TREATMENT: REPORT ON FIFTY-ONE PATIENTS

Author Affiliations

Durham, N.C.

From the Division of Thoracic Surgery, Duke Hospital, Duke University School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1957;164(6):655-658. doi:10.1001/jama.1957.02980060031008
Abstract

• Intermittent episodes of aphagia, which result from the failure of the coordinated motor activity of the esophagus and the cardia, and reflux of digestive juices into the esophagus through an incompetent cardiac sphincter are the most common presenting symptoms of sliding hiatal hernia. Of 51 cases of hiatal hernia reviewed from 1951 to 1955, 22 were surgically treated by simple repositioning of the esophagocardial junction. Twenty can be said to have had satisfactory results. There were no deaths attributable to the operation. Complicated instances of esophagitis associated with hiatal hernias should be treated conservatively.

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