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Article
July 7, 1956

INCOMPLETE INFARCTION OF ILEUM SIMULATING REGIONAL ENTERITIS

JAMA. 1956;161(10):963-964. doi:10.1001/jama.1956.62970100001009
Abstract

Segmental inflammatory lesions of the small intestine are usually of the type described by Warren and Sommers1 as "chronic cicatrizing enteritis" (regional ileitis). Recently a stenosing segmental lesion of the small intestine has been reported that was evidently the result of mesenteric arterial occlusion.2 Another example is here reported of a chronic cicatrizing lesion of the small intestine secondary to embolic obstruction of a branch of the superior mesenteric artery. The lesion was sharply segmental in extent and might be clinically or pathologically confused with regional enteritis.

Report of a Case  A 54-year-old man developed signs and symptoms compatible with arteriosclerotic heart disease in 1951. Exertional angina, ankle edema, and orthopnea, which characterized his illness, gradually increased in severity despite routine therapy for congestive heart failure. During 1952 and 1953 the patient had occasional epigastric pain, which was relieved by food or antacid therapy. In October, 1953, he

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