[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
August 10, 1957

PROGNOSIS IN POST-TRAUMATIC EPILEPSYA TEN-YEAR FOLLOW-UP OF CRANIOCEREBRAL INJURIES OF WORLD WAR II

JAMA. 1957;164(15):1636-1641. doi:10.1001/jama.1957.02980150004002
Abstract

• Brain damage following craniocerebral injuries is much more devastating in its effect on the personality and the total individual than a chronic disability limited to some other part of the body. In evaluating the capacities of an individual after the occurrence of a head injury the total picture must be examined, for the disturbance is more than the sum of hemiplegia and epilepsy. Even if post-traumatic seizures do develop, it should be clearly understood that they do not forecast recurrent convulsive attacks. The contention that a few dizzy spells or momentary blackouts after a head injury, along with abnormal electroencephalographic findings, are sufficient to establish the diagnosis a chronic epilepsy is false, since neither these clinical manifestations nor abnormal brain waves are adequate for the diagnosis of a convulsive disorder per se.

×