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Article
August 24, 1957

SOME BIOCHEMICAL ASPECTS OF LIPID AND LIPOPROTEIN METABOLISM

JAMA. 1957;164(17):1895-1899. doi:10.1001/jama.1957.62980170007007b
Abstract

The impetus given to research in lipid metabolism by the increasing interest in the problem of atherosclerosis has yielded a bounty of information in recent years. The clinician and the nutritionist cannot escape a requirement for an ever-broadening familiarity with certain practical aspects of lipid chemistry and physiology. The nature of dietary fat is becoming more meaningful than its simple caloric content, and determination of the plasma cholesterol level alone no longer represents an adequate examination of the blood lipids. It is the purpose of this paper to summarize some aspects of our basic knowledge concerning lipid transport mechanisms and fat metabolism that are of clinical importance.

Blood Lipids and Lipoproteins  In 100 cc. of plasma of a normal fasting human, there is about 300 mg. of fatty acids. Roughly 80% of these fatty acids are present in phospholipids or in simple esters of glycerol. This latter group of esters

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