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Article
September 21, 1957

THE U. S. ARMY MEDICAL DEPARTMENT IN WORLD WAR IITHE HISTORY OF THE HISTORY

JAMA. 1957;165(3):241-253. doi:10.1001/jama.1957.72980210003011
Abstract

When Brig. Gen. Frank W. Weed, M. C., had finished his labors as editor of the history of the United States Army Medical Department in World War I, he wrote a most excellent and readable account of his experience.1 In it, he remarked that if the personnel responsible for writing the history of the War of the Rebellion had been available at the time the history of World War I was written, and if they had kept abreast of the times, the latter history would have been produced much more expeditiously in respect to quality, time, and money. Even if they had not kept abreast of the times, they would have been very useful indeed. In fact, almost the only assumption in which General Weed was wrong was contained in his sound advice—which was not followed—that a directive, with the force of Army Regulations, should be prepared to provide

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