[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
July 28, 1956

THE RESPONSIBILITY OF THE GRADUATE EDUCATOR IN NEUROLOGY AND PSYCHIATRY

JAMA. 1956;161(13):1213-1219. doi:10.1001/jama.1956.02970130001001
Abstract

• World War II brought about acceptance of the relationship between emotional disturbances and such organic dysfunctions as peptic ulcer, migraine, hypertension, and asthma. Nevertheless, the tendency to compartmentalization, splitting neurology from psychiatry, and even making distinctions between office psychiatry and the handling of acutely disturbed patients, continued to inordinate extremes. The result has been an excessive devotion to particular methods of diagnosis or modes of therapy on the part of the teachers, with a commensurate unwillingness to acquire a truly broad training on the part of their students. The deviations and excessive specialization of the trainees out in practice result from similar tendencies among their teachers. Broadness is the essence, for the generation now being produced must not hand on a tradition of constricted interests and unbalanced perspectives to the generations that follow.

×