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Article
October 19, 1957

TRANSPORTATION OF SICK AND INJURED IN CIVILIAN AIRCRAFT

JAMA. 1957;165(7):808-812. doi:10.1001/jama.1957.02980250042010
Abstract

Medical advice as to the transportation of patients in civilian aircraft is now based on an immense accumulation of experience. The year 1955 in the United States alone yielded data on more than 24 billion passenger-miles. Included were many passengers handicapped by various chronic defects, or going to medical centers for diagnosis, or returning home after treatment. The annual number of deaths during flight has ranged from 7 in 1948 to 20 in 1954; unconsciousness occurred 36 times in 1947 and 119 times in 1954. About half of the cases of unconsciousness or of death were ascribed to cardiovascular disease. Facts assembled on the incidence of motion sickness have led to concrete recommendations as to prevention and treatment. Certain patients should not fly without a companion well qualified to care for them in emergencies; certain others should not fly at all. For the vast majority of patients required to travel, however, flying is swift, comfortable, economical, and safe.

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