[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 35.153.73.72. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
October 19, 1957

SOCIAL SECURITY FOR PHYSICIANS: 2. POSITION OF THE MEDICAL PROFESSION CONCERNING THE COVERAGE OF PHYSICIANS UNDER THE SOCIAL SECURITY ACT

JAMA. 1957;165(7):834-835. doi:10.1001/jama.1957.72980250009015

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

The American Medical Association, through repeated actions of its House of Delegates and Board of Trustees, has expressed its opposition to the compulsory coverage of physicians under Title II (Old Age, Survivors and Disability Insurance Provisions) of the Social Security Act. The Association is not opposed to the voluntary inclusion of physicians under this title of the act.

Eight years ago, in June, 1949, at Atlantic City, the House of Delegates adopted a resolution disapproving the extension of "Social Security" to self-employed individuals including physicians.

In December, 1953, the House again opposed such coverage. In June, 1954, 1955, and 1956, the House reaffirmed its opposition to the compulsory coverage of physicians under the Social Security Act. In June, 1954, the Board of Trustees enlarged upon the Association's position to indicate that there was no opposition to the coverage of physicians under the act on a voluntary basis.

In June, 1957,

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×