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Article
July 28, 1956

PHYSICAL AND PHYSIOLOGICAL CLUES FOR DIAGNOSING ECZEMA

JAMA. 1956;161(13):1226-1229. doi:10.1001/jama.1956.02970130014004
Abstract

• The patient with atopic eczema is likely to have a personal and family history of hay fever, asthma, and eczema. He has a type of pallor caused by constant cutaneous vasospasm and a labile cutaneous vascular reaction pattern manifested by certain responses to stroking and to intradermal injections of drugs. His blood pressure is low but rises into the hypertensive range in the cold pressor test. His skin is dry, is easily chapped, and manifests sweat retention in various ways. He is more liable than most people to juvenile cataract.

This type of patient gives more immediate positive reactions to skin tests than does the average person and frequently shows a pustular reaction at 48 hours to a patch test with 5% solution of nickel sulfate. His emotional reactions are likewise characteristic of a certain personality pattern. These facts aid in the recognition of atopic dermatitis and determine the course of treatment.

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