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Article
July 28, 1956

OCULAR TOXICITY OF WHIPCIDE (3-METHYL-1-PENTYN-3-YL ACID PHTHALATE) IN HUMANS

JAMA. 1956;161(13):1252-1253. doi:10.1001/jama.1956.62970130001010
Abstract

Whipcide (3-methyl-l-pentyn-3-yl acid phthalate) has recently gained an enviable reputation in veterinary medicine as a 95% effective agent against dog whipworm, Trichuris vulpis. It is interesting that the damage caused by these worms has apparently usually been underestimated in the past; only by the clinical improvement following their removal has it now become evident that canine whipworm disease may be characterized by any of a number of symptoms, such as diarrhea, dermatitis, emaciation, nervousness, anorexia, perverted appetite, and convulsions. The effective dose in dogs is in the range of 250 mg. per kilogram of body weight in a single dose.

Human whipworm (Trichuris trichiura) infection is similar to the canine disease in that it has been difficult to eradicate with agents so far known and its potential damage to the host has frequently been underestimated. True, there is agreement that an overwhelming infection in an infant may produce diarrhea, dysentery,

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