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Article
December 7, 1957

LABORATORY AIDS IN DIAGNOSIS OF MYOCARDIAL INFARCTIONCHANGES IN MUSCLE ENZYMES, ERYTHROCYTE SEDIMENTATION RATE, AND C-REACTIVE PROTEIN IN MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION

JAMA. 1957;165(14):1776-1781. doi:10.1001/jama.1957.02980320006003
Abstract

The significance of certain enzymes in the serum (glutamic oxalacetic transaminase, glutamic pyruvic transaminase, and lactic dehydrogenase) was demonstrated by the experimental production of myocardial infarction and ischemia in dogs. The SGO-T (concentration of glutamic oxalacetic transaminase in the serum) was found to rise roughly in proportion to the amount of infarcted myocardium found at autopsy, while the concentration of the enzyme in the infarcted myocardium decreased in proportion to the age of the infarct. The SGO-T values in 297 of 300 patients after unequivocal acute transmural myocardial infarction rose to from 1.5 to 20 times the normal figure within 48 hours. All three enzymes were followed in 50 patients with the same condition and were found to increase in the serum, the elevation being especially prolonged in the case of lactic dehydrogenase. Data were also obtained from 50 patients with status anginosus, from 11 patients with acute pericarditis of varying etiology, and from 15 dogs with experimental impairment of coronary circulation. The behavior of these enzymes was found to differ in timing and in other respects from nonspecific reactions like the erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, and plasma fibrinogen. Information from one group of tests therefore supplements that obtained from the other. If carefully interpreted they are of great diagnostic value.

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