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Article
December 14, 1957

TREATMENT OF CARDIAC ARREST DUE TO ACUTE POTASSIUM INTOXICATIONRESTORATION OF NORMAL SINUS RHYTHM AFTER TREATMENT WITH ARTIFICIAL KIDNEY

JAMA. 1957;165(15):1953-1955. doi:10.1001/jama.1957.72980330001013
Abstract

The recognition and treatment of acute potassium intoxication in acute renal failure are familiar to clinicians. Yet a fatal outcome with cardiac arrest due to a rapidly progressing potassium intoxication is encountered occasionally. The purpose of this communication is to report the sequence of events in a patient with acute renal failure, potassium intoxication, and cardiac arrest. Prompt cardiac massage resulted in return of normal sinus rhythm after 4 hours and 20 minutes of dialysis with the artificial kidney.

Report of a Case  A 29-year-old man was admitted to the University of Kansas Medical Center on Jan. 29, 1957, for treatment with the artificial kidney because of severe acute uremia with potassium intoxication. The patient became anuric on the second postoperative day after an exploratory laparotomy at another hospital. The serum potassium level rapidly rose to 8.5 mEq. per liter on the fourth postoperative day, when he was transferred to

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