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Article
December 28, 1957

PRACTICAL PLAN FOR LONG-TERM TREATMENT OF HYPERTENSION

JAMA. 1957;165(17):2143-2146. doi:10.1001/jama.1957.02980350001001
Abstract

Among 50 physicians responding to a questionnaire, 16 stated that they occasionally had a patient with hypertension take his own blood pressure at home and 3 said they often did so, if the patient was on a prolonged schedule of treatment with hypotensive drugs. Some physicians believed that it is unwise for the patient to know his own blood pressure, even when on therapy with the more potent drugs, but actual investigation did not support this belief. Of 13 patients interviewed, 4 said they did not like to take their own blood pressures and would not advise others to do so,but 9 were satisfied with the program. It has obvious advantages over the infrequent readings of blood pressure obtained under the conditions that usually prevail in a physician's office. The frequent, regular taking of blood pressure is especially important if vigorous antihypertensive therapy is being given in severe cases.

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