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Article
December 28, 1957

SPECTROGRAPHIC STUDY OF TRACE ELEMENTS IN CANCEROUS AND NONCANCEROUS HUMAN TISSUES

JAMA. 1957;165(17):2187-2192. doi:10.1001/jama.1957.72980350002012
Abstract

The etiological relationship of specific metals and their compounds to neoplasia has not seemed as important a field of investigation as has that of a number of organic compounds, especially the volatile coal-tar products of industry. Barnett1 reported carcinoma of the nasal passages, paranasal sinuses, and lungs among workers in nickel refineries. The incidence of carcinoma of the lung with exposure to chromates has been mentioned by Hueper and others,2 and a high content of molybdenum,2e zinc,3 and other metals in tumor or host tissues has been recorded.4

Some metals and their compounds, even when present in large amounts in the tissues, have no recognized carcinogenic properties; others, such as copper and iron, which are selectively stored in the liver and spleen of patients with tumor tissues5 are not regarded as having a causal relation to the disease. Among the metals and their compounds

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