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Article
August 11, 1956

SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA OF ABDOMINAL WALLREPORT OF A CASE

JAMA. 1956;161(15):1473-1474. doi:10.1001/jama.1956.62970150001009
Abstract

A 66-year-old widow entered St. Luke's Hospital in January, 1955. Her presenting complaint was a mass on the anterior abdominal wall. Other than the presenting complaint, she considered herself to be in good health. Seven years prior to admission, she noted a small area of irritation of the skin of the abdominal wall on the lower right side. She treated the lesion with wet dressings; however, it failed to heal. Approximately five years later, in falling, she traumatized the lesion, causing it to bleed. Between May, 1954, and January, 1955, she had anorexia and a weight loss of 37 lb. (16.8 kg.). No other gastrointestinal symptoms were elicited. From September, 1954, to January, 1955, the lesion grew rapidly from an estimated diameter of 3.5 cm. to approximately 13 cm. In December, 1954, the tumor began to bleed spontaneously, about every three days. Furthermore, it constantly produced a clear, sticky, watery

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