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Article
February 8, 1958

FIVE-YEAR CURE RATES OF CLINICALLY OCCULT AND SUSPECTED UTERINE CARCINOMAS: A COMMUNITY CANCER DETECTION PROGRAM

Author Affiliations

Toledo, Ohio

From the Department of Pathology, Mercy Hospital, and the Academy of Medicine of Toledo and Lucas County.

JAMA. 1958;166(6):568-571. doi:10.1001/jama.1958.02990060006002
Abstract

The effectiveness of a community program for the early detection of uterine cancer is evaluated on the basis of experience with 62,382 cytological examinations and 1,951 biopsies performed on 29,687 patients during a period of nine years. Data on the distribution of cancer according to site, on the frequency of false-positive and false-negative cytological findings, on age-incidence, and on five-year cure rates were obtained. In the case of patients with cervical carcinoma who qualified for five-year follow-up studies, out of 53 suspected lesions 43 were in the late invasive stage, while out of 22 occult lesions only 4 were late invasive. Among the 75 patients with either suspected or occult cervical carcinoma, there were no deaths when the carcinoma was in situ and only three patients with carcinoma of the early invasive type were either dead of cancer or living with evidence of cancer. Repeated routine cytological examinations of vaginal and cervical secretions result in detection of cervical cancer in younger women and at an earlier stage than if the patient permits a neoplasm to progress until symptoms lead to a suspicion of cancer. Early detection and proper treatment greatly improve the prognosis for the patient.

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