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Article
March 8, 1958

HYGIENE AND EDUCATION WITHIN HOSPITALS TO PREVENT STAPHYLOCOCCIC INFECTIONS

Author Affiliations

Berkeley, Calif.

JAMA. 1958;166(10):1185-1191. doi:10.1001/jama.1958.62990100013011c
Abstract

Throughout recorded history physicians have made serious efforts to prevent cross infections in hospitalized patients. Modern bacteriology supplied a reasonable rationale for the formulation of methods. The detailed measures essential to aseptic and isolation techniques became accepted by all hospital personnel as a matter of course for regular daily operations. Considerable success in preventing intrahospital infections was a result. A change in approach has begun to develop over the past 20 years, with the introduction of effective chemotherapeutic agents. Sulfapyridine, in 1938, began the modern therapeutic era for Staphylococcus (Micrococcus) pyogenes.1 Because of the effectiveness of antimicrobials, a tendency to overlook the time-tested methods became apparent.2 The use of antimicrobials for preventing staphylococcic infections became relatively ineffective. The facility with which strains of Staphylococcus pyogenes develop resistance to antimicrobials is a discouraging aspect of the experience with each antibiotic discovered.3 The situation at present finds specific therapy

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